Blogs

Next Milestones - April for Review Recommendations

The release of the government review in how to manage flooding in Western Sydney is due in April, after the NSW state election. 

We fear that this review will recommend the raising of the dam at a time when political sensitivity to the electorate is low.

http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/climate-variability-les...

Colong Foundation Media Release : Raising Warragamba Dam Wall - Expensive, Ineffective and Environmentally Destructive

Raising the wall of Warragamba Dam by 23 metres to reduce downstream flooding -- as recommended in the Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley Flood Management Review -- would lead to the destruction of some of the most heavily-protected wilderness areas in Australia, yet still fail to eliminate the flood risks for western Sydney communities. 

Raising Warragamba Dam Wall - The Bushwalker Vol 38 issue 2

First published in "The Bushwalker".

For many bushwalkers reading about a proposal to raise Warragamba Dam by 23 metres will feel like a bad case of deja vu. In the 90’s bushwalkers were at the forefront of the three-year campaign against this proposal — rallying around its impact on the lower reaches of the Kowmung River. Despite winning that battle, with the incoming Carr Government dumping the plan, it appears the war is far from over.

Wilderness at risk from plan to raise Warragamba Dam

The proposal to raise Warragamba Dam is like a political zombie — a bad idea that despite being buried almost two decades ago just refuses to die.

And even though it comes with a price tag of at least half a billion dollars, the proposal to extend the existing dam wall upwards by 23 metres has suddenly found some serious backers.

» Read the full article on the fatcanyoners website

Don't raise the dam

The proposal to raise the height of Warragamba Dam by 14 metres is unnecessary and environmentally damaging. The existing dam and auxiliary spillway provides the necessary dam safety. Installing new flood gates and improved flood monitoring would provide substantial flood mitigation at a saving of more than $700 million.